All Posts (2814)

Sort by

Lower ME

Back Squat135x3 185x3 225x1 275x1 315x1 365x1 385xmiss 365x2x1 385xmissSumo Dead225x3 275x1 315x1 365x1 405x1 455xmissWalking Lunge 3 trips around 23 steps for 1 w/ 65sKB Swing 3x10 45Hanging Leg Raise Hold with 20kg plate on my lap 3x15secRev Hypers 3x10
Read more…

First "Combat Hard" Combative Skills Clinic

On December 10th, we conducted the first "Combat Hard" Combative Skills clinic at Greater Atlanta Christian School. 33 athletes and coaches were in attendance. We worked on thai pad basic drills and added in a few MMA drills for fun. All the youth athletes had a blast and I can ensure you that they want more.For more information, please visit my blog at http://combativeskills.blogspot.com/.A website with more information will be available in Jan.Be safe and remember, "Train Today for Tomorrow's Battles!"

Read more…

Concurrent Training

While some sports primarily use one energy system (such as a cross-country athlete who primarily uses her/his aerobic system), others, such as American soccer, require excellent aerobic and anaerobic conditioning in order to maximize performance. While professionals working in sports requiring equal aerobic and anaerobic training seem to incorporate training that taxes both systems on a regular basis, I am curious about professionals working with athletes who primarily use their aerobic systems during competition. Studies (such as Hickson, R.C., B.A. Dvorak, E.M. Gorostiaga, T.T. Kurowski, and C. Foster. 1988. Potential for strength and endurance training to amplify endurance performance. Journal of Applied Physiology. 65:2285-2290 and Hickson, R.C., M.A. Rosenkoetter, and M.M. Brown. 1980. Strength training effects on aerobic power and short-term endurance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Journal of Anatomy. 116:57-65 have shown that if properly implemented strength training an athlete primarily utilizing her/his aerobic energy system during competition does not hinder performance. Moreover, when implemented correctly and supplemented with appropriate rest the added strength actually improves performance and reduces the risk of injury. Nevertheless, despite findings from studies such as those noted above which support supplementing aerobic training with strength/resistance training there are coaches out there who feel that such supplementation can hinder the performance of athletes primarily utilizing her/his aerobic energy system during competition. So, I'm interested in the opinion of others out there: Do you believe it's ok to supplement strength training with aerobic training for athletes primarily utilizing their aerobic energy source? If so, how often do you supplement aerobic training with strength/resistance training? If not, what are your concerns?
Read more…

Weight Room quotes

hello coaches,just looking for some ideas of weight room quotes that you all have up in your weight room.I'm going to have some input as which quotes/sayings are going to be up in our new weight room and I'ld like to see what others have.Thanks,B
Read more…

Basketball training: Specialization?

Over the years strength and conditioning programs have evolved from a "one size fits all" philosophy for a more customized program that bases specific strength and conditioning exercises on the types of movements/actions an athlete performs due to her/his specific role on the field/court. For example, while most athletes on an American-style football team will perform similar exercises, there will be some strength & conditioning exercises designed specifically for linemen and others designed specifically for defensive backs. Thus, the linemen will perform some exercises relevant to them because of the skills necessary to play their position. Similarly, they will not perform the exercises designed specifically for defensive backs because the movements/skills required by defensive backs are unique only to them. Another example is track & field. An athlete specializing in the javelin will perform exercises designed to condition/strengthen the attributes needed specifically for the javelin. As such, she/he will perform exercises unique to her/his sport which, in turn, will differ from the training exercises performed by a sprinter. (Other exercises may be similar.) All of the above brings me to one central question: Why, when training basketball teams do many strength & conditioning programs design a "universal" program that is utilized by each player on the team, regardless of position? Granted, many of the movements on the court are similar, regardless of position. But, there are some unique attributes/skills required by a point/shooting guard that are not required by a strong forward or center (and vice versus). Thus, why are basketball strength & conditioning programs not traditionally developed in a more customized manner? I'm interested to hear the thoughts of others out there. I'm sure there are some highly customized programs as well. Any examples to share?
Read more…

Baseball: Strengthening the throwing arm

Those not familiar with strength training as it relates to baseball athletes (or athletes in other sports requiring overhead throwing) may believe that the secret to improving speed and longevity/conditioning in the throwing arm of these athletes lies solely in the continued development of the throwing arm. Coaching specializing in such athletes, however, know that the secret to developing a strong, powerful and well-conditioned throwing athlete resides in the development of the entire kinetic chain. The throwing process requires the hip, trunk and shoulder muscles to exert a maximal amount of force in a minimal amount of time. By efficiently transferring energy from the lower extremities through the torso and finally through the upper extremity maximal force can be produced. Thus, implementing a strength & conditioning program that focus on the proximal-to-distal sequence of motions: stride, pelvis rotation, upper-torso rotation, elbow extension, shoulder internal rotation, and wrist flexion, while also facilitating an increase in motor unit recruitment should be considered. Plyometric-type exercises have been linked to improving throwing capability and longevity by addressing the movements noted above. I'm curious to know from others what specific plyometric exercises you use in your programs and what other means of development you've implemented to both strengthen and condition an athlete that participates in sports that incorporate overhead throwing (namely pitchers). That's all for now!
Read more…
Lets consider the top 5 BCS teams as of the latest poll posted November 2, 2008: 1.) Alabama 2.) Texas Tech 3.) Penn State 4.) Texas 5.) Florida Recruiting top tier Division I athletes is obviously an important variable in the success of these programs. Further, premier (as determined by their experience and success during their tenure) coaches implementing sound strategies are yet another block in the foundation of a winning football program. One can not, however, ignore the importance of keeping key players healthy throughout the duration of a college football season and the often crippling effect that such injuries can have on a team that otherwise would have ended it's season with a national championship ring. The fact that the above noted teams find themselves ranked in the Top 5 of the BCS is a testament to the overall health of the starting battalions and the ability of healthy, well-developed second-string players to fill in where/when needed. The pre-season and in-season training regimens implemented by these programs are by far some of the best in the country. Check out the following for more information on the leaders of these programs: University of Alabama: Scott Cochran Texas Tech University: Bennie Wylie Penn State University: Chip Harrison University of Texas: Jeff Madden University of Florida: Mickey Marotti AND Article
Read more…
While many performance enhancing "drugs" have been ruled illegal by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the use of caffeine as a supplement has been deemed legal up to a urine caffeine concentration level of 15 µg/mL. Moreover, in 2005 the International Olympic Committee removed caffeine from its "banned substance" list. (It does still monitor caffeine consumption, however). The limits placed on the consumption of caffeine by some governing bodies and the removal of limits by other governing bodies prompted a question from me: Does the ingestion of caffeine prior to an athletic endeavor really make a difference in performance? Studies regarding the ergogenic effects (reported as an increase in oxygen consumption and/or an improvement in performance times) are conflicting. Some studies have shown positive improvements while others have noted little to no change in performance when caffeine is ingested. Thus, when a majority of the data is taken into account the overall results could be deemed "inconclusive". Further, when all of the data is taken into consideration the benefits of caffeine (within the above noted legal limits) on athletic performance are often dependent on the athlete her/himself and the type of workout in which she/he is currently involved: age, weight, metabolism, amount of caffeine, timing of intake, caffeine sensitivity, hydration status, training level and type of training. Some athletes will show noticeable improvements in performance when caffeine is ingested prior to a workout/athletic event, while others will show little to no response. All of this encouraged me to ask you: What is your opinion of the benefits of caffeine on athletic performance? How do you approach this subject with your athletes?
Read more…

Football Winter Conditioning - Competition

I'm a true believer that you have to be a competitor in everything, I just think when you can win or lose you work harder. I was wondering what some of you do at your program in the winter to force your athletes to compete.At Fordham, we break our team up into small groups and have a points system with rewards. We also have a rating system based on test results with categories that the athletes can achieve. This year, I want to make our conditioning drills more competitve, once the coaches get off the road recruiting, we do a traditional "station" sytle winter workout, followed by some type of sprint work. Prior to them being around, i run the team in groups 2 days a week doing linear speed work one day and change of direction work on another.I was wondering what drills you guys do during team runs... I was thinking of implementing plate races, towel 1 on 1 tug of war, tire flips for time, stick wrestling, and farmers walk relays. Any drills you guys have or are thinking of implementing would be great to discus.Let's all bounce some ideas off eachother to get after our athletes this winter.TP
Read more…
While many collegiate and professional American Football strength programs follow similar intensity in the off-season, if one were to pull 10 coaches into a room for a discussion of the intensity and types of exercises to be used to support/maintain the strength of American football players DURING the season, it is likely that 10 different philosophies would be realized. The purpose of the off-season strength program is to promote functional strength & power AND prepare players for the brutal pounding that takes place during a given football season. Maintaining the gains made during the off-season, however, is often viewed as a necessary evil. Players must continue to maintain their gains, but not at the sacrifice of their performance on the field. Moreover, one must be careful to assure that the in-season strength program does not promote injury due to a weakened state realized during a pounding football season. As such, there are conflicting ideologies surrounding the proper implementation of an in-season American Football strength program. Some coaches implement programs that utilize high percentages of a 1RM while minimizing volume in terms of reps and/or sets. Others maintain that the percentage of a 1RM must be reduced in-season while favoring higher reps/sets. Still others reduce both the percentage of 1RMs used as well as minimizing the sets/reps. Removing high intensity exercises (such as power cleans in favor of less intense rack cleans) is also considered. Personally, I believe that in-season it is necessary to continue to maintain explosive/functional POWER over all-out strength. While weights used must be reduced to, say, 65-70% (as a percentage of tested 1RMs), I also believe that weights/sets should be reduced. Further, olympic type lifts should continue to be implemented (I.e. Cleans, Snatch Squats, etc.) as one can simply not simulate explosive movements in the weight room through any other means. Rather than "how much", my philosophy is to realize quality reps during a reduced weight/rep/set program. This quality over quantity philosophy will maintain explosive power while ensuring that the in-season weight program does not limit the recovery time of an athlete in the midst of their season. I'm interested to hear other philosophies
Read more…
Given the way that the University of North Carolina football team is playing so far this year it's difficult to argue against the great job he's done in rebuilding a program that hasn't had much to cheer for over the last decade. He's brought in excellent assistant coaches and is convincing quality recruits who never would have looked at UNC in the past to come create glory as a Tarheel. I had the fortunate opportunity to watch the Tarheels play live as an on-field spectator vs. Notre Dame this past Saturday, October 11th as they extended their record to 5-1. I was struck at the improvement in speed and stamina displayed by this year's UNC team. They were beaten soundly in the first half. Nevertheless, they came out in the second half fired up and ready to take control of the game. Their ability to do so is based in more than a simply half-time speech by Butch Davis and Co. They were mentally and physically prepared to battle to the end. Jeff Connors, a "Master Strength & Conditioning Coach", as designated by the Collegiate Strength & Conditioning Coaches association, and the Assistant Athletic Director for Strength & Conditioning, has been involved with UNC for the past 8-years. Currently in charge of the football and women's basketball teams, Connors has a history of developing student-athletes into professional athletes. Perhaps more important for the Strength & Conditioning profession, however, is his ability to mentor future professional strength coaches. (See the list of coaches he's mentored in the above link.) I also find it interesting that UNC recognizes the need to specialize strength and conditioning training for "Olympic" sport athletes to the extent that they have actually brought in coaches to lead the development of their olympic sport athletes. Greg Gatz, the Director of Strength & Conditioning/Olympic Sports, and his staff of Steve Gisselman, Melissa Glyptis and Eric Biener do an excellent job of training athletes in sports ranging from rowing to track and field to fencing and beyond. Check out the program. It's one of the nation's gems.
Read more…
I spent Thursday night, Oct. 9th, on the field and in the stands watching Wake Forest pull out a 12-7 win versus Clemson in a battle of two ACC heavyweights. This win was the second "come from behind" Wake Forest performance. After watching the 4-1 Demon Deacons up close and in person I now have a better understanding of why they are able to close out a game with the same level of performance as they start each game. Simply put, I feel that they are one of the best conditioned football teams on the collegiate stage. For those of you who have not yet looked into the Wake Forest Strength & Conditioning program, take some time to do so. Ethan Reeve, Wake Forest's Director of Strength and Conditioning and one of only 70 "Master Strength and Conditioning" Coaches in the country, uses his background as a two-time NCAA All-American wrestler and strength & conditioning professional to train his athletes in a very sport specific manner. Simply put, Ethan trains his athletes based on the sport(s) he or she plays. In the case of his football players, he employs unique workouts designed to mimic the specific physical stresses and specific periods of recovery a football player will experience throughout the course of a game. To this extent Ethan is a strong believer in the benefit of "kettle balls" when preparing a football player to compete. In an age when most programs stress the basics: bench press, squat and power clean, it's nice to see emphasis being placed on alternative means of developing functional strength. Scroll down in the attached link and you will find a detailed synopsis of Ethan's strength & conditioning philosophy.
Read more…

Another Fantastic College Football Weekend

Well, another great weekend of battles on the college gridiron has come to a close. I continue to be amazed at the difference a finely integrated strength and conditioning program can make in a team's ability to compete in the second half of football games. Those of you who were able to catch the Florida State vs. University of Miami football game understand exactly what I mean. Whether these two teams are competing for a national championship or not, one can usually expect an intense on-field affair during their annual "friendly". With Miami down 24-3 at halftime, however, it appeared that this game was going to be a sleeper. What the audience failed to realize was that Miami's Will remained strong and, because of their conditioning program their bodies were ready for a second-half fight. This is a testament to Andreu Swasey's leadership as UM's head strength and conditioning coach. Further, Miami does not underestimate the importance of the nutritional side of athletic development. Rather, they have created an excellent resource for all of their University student-athletes by establishing a "Sports Performance" program led by Lisa Dorfman, MS, RD, CSSD, LMHC-UM Sports Nutritionist. We all know that while it's important to be able to be prepared both mentally and physically to explode "out of the box" at the start of the game. Maintaining and/or building on that physical and mental strength as a game/event goes on, often proves to be just as important and executing "x's and o's" when separating the winners from the losers as the clock strikes zero. While Miami came up just short in this 41-39 shootout, it wasn't for a lack of mental and/or physical preparation. I'm interested in your thoughts on other games from this past weekend you felt provided examples of transferring off-field mental and physical preparation onto the gridiron.
Read more…