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Gauging Response

How do you gauge response from exercise?  It's an important topic for athletes and one that doesn't come-up too often.  Personally, I prefer to try and get feedback from athletes on a workout by workout basis regarding how they're feeling (healthy, ok, not healthy). 

At first, I think many athletes are reluctant to provide this information for fear of how they may be viewed, but over time and when trust is built I've found athletes will be honest about how they are feeling, both physically and emotionally.  Certainly, there are blood tests that can provide information on stress and inflammatory markers and this is important information.  Lastly, a lot can be said for measuring resting heart rate and blood pressure values in helping to gauge response to exercise.

The training timer should not be automatically set to "go."  One needs to gauge response to exercise as enthusiastically as promoting training sessions.  Prudence here pays off in a big way when trying to head-off injuries.

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Coaching Pedigree

I am definitely not a betting man, but if I were to bet on the horses I would thoroughly investigate a horse’s pedigree before I bet on a horse. It is the same in coaching and teaching. Pedigree and lineage mean are meaningful. Who were your mentors? Who did you learn from? You can’t choose your parents, but you can choose your mentors, that will determine your pedigree. More letters after your name do not improve your pedigree, gaining knowledge and experience do improve your pedigree. Remember Seabiscuit did not have the pedigree, but that horse had people who believed in him and sought out the knowledge to make him better. If they would have listened to conventional wisdom Seabiscuit would not have been a winner. Create your own pedigree.

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How to Treat Hamstring Injuries

Unfortunately for frequent runners, as well as other athletes in high-endurance sports, the hamstring muscle truly is your Achilles heel. Injuries ranging from a mild strain, all the way to a complete tear in the muscle tissue or the tendon are very common, and they require first aid on the spot to mitigate the pain, and then rehabilitation combined with an exercise program depending on the severity of the injury.

Since a large portion of injured runners have a high risk of repeated injury within a year, it’s crucial to understand the importance of prevention, as well as the best treatment options to lower the possibility of re-injury.

Understanding the Hamstring

A muscle group at the back of your thigh that constitutes a large segment of your posterior chain, the hamstring is made up of three separate muscles and connective tissue, ranging from underneath your pelvis and all the way to your tibia. Their primary role is to allow hip extension and knee flexion, which are key joint movements in walking, running or jumping.

While any segment of the hamstring can be injured, the most frequent injury in runners is of the outer hamstring muscle called the bicep femoris.

Common Causes of Injury

An imbalance in strength between the anterior and the posterior chain (the hamstring and the quadriceps in this case) is to a great degree responsible for injuries. The force of straightening the stronger quadriceps will pull your pelvis and overextend the hamstring, often causing a tear in the muscle or the tendon.

The gluteus muscles also play a key role in the proper functioning of the hamstring. That is why weak glutes can cause an overload on the hamstring, as your body tries to compensate for the necessary effort, thus causing a tear or a strain.

Improper warmup poses a great threat to your entire body, including your hamstrings, increasing your chances of injury. Muscle fatigue, or overtraining can also cause injury, particularly when there in another factor such as muscle weakness or strength imbalance. Lack of flexibility can also be a contributing factor, since limited range of motion can overload the hamstring.

Treatment and Prevention

Depending on the location, type and severity, the treatment will vary, but there are a few key steps each non-surgical rehabilitation program includes, and they are easily remembered as the RICE protocol.

Rest is the crucial first step to allow proper healing. Crutches can be used to enable walking without putting any weight onto the injured leg, because that might lead to further tissue damage and slow down healing.

Adjusting your nutrition can be quite helpful. It is important to improve your magnesium intake, either by eating such fruit like bananas or getting some quality magnesium supplements to help your body heal faster.

Ice is the go-to treatment for any sports-related injury, because regular ice packs placed on the affected area help reduce swelling and alleviate pain. My injury required ice packs 3-4 times every day, 15 minutes in duration, to help me manage pain in the first several days.

Compressing your leg with an elastic bandage may help reduce swelling and scarring by preventing further bleeding.

Elevate your leg on a pillow while lying down to minimize swelling and immobilize your leg, which will significantly help in the healing process.

Once the first few days or weeks (in case of a severe injury) have passed, and you no longer have any swelling, cold packs can be replaced with moist heat, to relieve pain and relax the affected muscle. In case of severe injuries and acute pain, your doctor might prescribe medications, which can also help with reducing swelling, but not necessarily, since pain relief is their primary function.

Prevention is essential, especially for those who have already had some form of injury, so proper warmup and cool down are vital parts of your training, and you shouldn’t rush through them. Maintain your cardiovascular health and well-balanced strength, work on your flexibility, gradually increase the duration and intensity of your training, wear proper protective gear and avoid overtraining for best effects.

Some hamstring injuries will heal within several weeks, while more serious ones need several months of immobilization, rest and rehabilitation exercises. It’s best if you consult a professional and allow for a physical therapist to monitor your recovery, and you’ll quickly be back on track!

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How to Treat Hamstring Injuries

Unfortunately for frequent runners, as well as other athletes in high-endurance sports, the hamstring muscle truly is your Achilles heel. Injuries ranging from a mild strain, all the way to a complete tear in the muscle tissue or the tendon are very common, and they require first aid on the spot to mitigate the pain, and then rehabilitation combined with an exercise program depending on the severity of the injury.

Since a large portion of injured runners have a high risk of repeated injury within a year, it’s crucial to understand the importance of prevention, as well as the best treatment options to lower the possibility of re-injury.

Understanding the Hamstring

A muscle group at the back of your thigh that constitutes a large segment of your posterior chain, the hamstring is made up of three separate muscles and connective tissue, ranging from underneath your pelvis and all the way to your tibia. Their primary role is to allow hip extension and knee flexion, which are key joint movements in walking, running or jumping.

While any segment of the hamstring can be injured, the most frequent injury in runners is of the outer hamstring muscle called the bicep femoris.

Common Causes of Injury

An imbalance in strength between the anterior and the posterior chain (the hamstring and the quadriceps in this case) is to a great degree responsible for injuries. The force of straightening the stronger quadriceps will pull your pelvis and overextend the hamstring, often causing a tear in the muscle or the tendon.

The gluteus muscles also play a key role in the proper functioning of the hamstring. That is why weak glutes can cause an overload on the hamstring, as your body tries to compensate for the necessary effort, thus causing a tear or a strain.

Improper warmup poses a great threat to your entire body, including your hamstrings, increasing your chances of injury. Muscle fatigue, or overtraining can also cause injury, particularly when there in another factor such as muscle weakness or strength imbalance. Lack of flexibility can also be a contributing factor, since limited range of motion can overload the hamstring.

Treatment and Prevention

Depending on the location, type and severity, the treatment will vary, but there are a few key steps each non-surgical rehabilitation program includes, and they are easily remembered as the RICE protocol.

Rest is the crucial first step to allow proper healing. Crutches can be used to enable walking without putting any weight onto the injured leg, because that might lead to further tissue damage and slow down healing.

Adjusting your nutrition can be quite helpful. It is important to improve your magnesium intake, either by eating such fruit like bananas or getting some quality magnesium supplements to help your body heal faster.

Ice is the go-to treatment for any sports-related injury, because regular ice packs placed on the affected area help reduce swelling and alleviate pain. My injury required ice packs 3-4 times every day, 15 minutes in duration, to help me manage pain in the first several days.

Compressing your leg with an elastic bandage may help reduce swelling and scarring by preventing further bleeding.

Elevate your leg on a pillow while lying down to minimize swelling and immobilize your leg, which will significantly help in the healing process.

Once the first few days or weeks (in case of a severe injury) have passed, and you no longer have any swelling, cold packs can be replaced with moist heat, to relieve pain and relax the affected muscle. In case of severe injuries and acute pain, your doctor might prescribe medications, which can also help with reducing swelling, but not necessarily, since pain relief is their primary function.

Prevention is essential, especially for those who have already had some form of injury, so proper warmup and cool down are vital parts of your training, and you shouldn’t rush through them. Maintain your cardiovascular health and well-balanced strength, work on your flexibility, gradually increase the duration and intensity of your training, wear proper protective gear and avoid overtraining for best effects.

Some hamstring injuries will heal within several weeks, while more serious ones need several months of immobilization, rest and rehabilitation exercises. It’s best if you consult a professional and allow for a physical therapist to monitor your recovery, and you’ll quickly be back on track!

Read more…

Tactical Athletes?

Definition of ATHLETE

1 : a person who is trained or skilled in exercises, sports, or games requiring physical strength, agility, or stamina

I think we should reconsider the notion of training military and tactical professionals like “tactical athletes.” After years of using this term myself, I am now moving away from using it. Why? I’m not sure that these professionals are athletes; rather, they’re military operators, law enforcement professionals, search and rescue professionals, and firefighters. They’re not training to play a game, rather to save and protect lives. There’s not an off-season or in-season or national championship, they have to be “on” each and every day.

Sure, it’s convenient to think of those within a tactical profession as athletes, but that thought has also created a chain of problems when it comes to helping these professionals prepare their bodies for their job function, which is NOT A SPORT. More specifically, training like an athlete in many circles means that these professionals have the same needs of D1 college football athletes, that floor-based Olympic lifts are a priority, that cross-fit is ideal because a lot of athletes use cross-fit, or that there’s something wrong with the way they move. Now, these are assumptions that I’ve heard over the years from tactical professionals and strength and conditioning professionals alike and I don’t think they are correct, BUT MANY in the profession are being scripted to think this way.

Here’s the BLUF:

1. Way more tactical professionals will struggle or die from health-related problems such as heart disease, stress-related problems, being overweight, physical inactivity, and problems relating to lack of sleep than will die from something directly related to their job function, such as fighting a fire.

Develop physical training plans that promote physical fitness, decrease stress, and teach healthy eating in a manner that is pertinent to being successful on the job.

2. A specific needs-analysis needs to be done with each specific tactical asset to better understand the job-related fitness demands and how physical training might better prepare the individual for these needs.

Build training constructs on the determined needs for each individual according to their job function and how to effectively deal with the stressors of the job. Add training elements that reinforce team-work, followership, tactical problem-solving, and promote a healthy atmosphere and work community.

3. Spending countless hours evaluating and trying to correct human movement patterns is a waste of time.

Focus on building individual STRENGTHS and taking a healthy attitude towards helping refine movement, if needed. In many cases, simply improving physical fitness, losing weight, or eliminating exercises that tear-down the body will improve movement.

4. There is a distinct need to help prepare for fitness testing.

Many tactical entities must undergo annual or semi-annual fitness testing. There generally is a lot on the line for these professionals to do well on these tests. There simply must be a construct woven into training that helps these professionals be better fitness testers in addition to their job function. Neglect this area and bad results, sometimes deadly results, can happen.

5. We need a better body of evidence and a better pathway to cultivate tactical strength and conditioning professionals.

I can state this loud enough and more clearly. There is too much training information coming from athletic strength and conditioning, medical professionals, sports sales, and from those within the tactical profession who are “hyper-fit” and not enough from actual tactical strength and conditioning coaches and exercise physiologists. We need to have a better pipeline of strength and conditioning coaches that are trained and taught by those who have worked with tactical populations and understand the cumulative needs of these professionals rather than by those trying to make collegiate, medical, or sterile lab-driven programs fit into a tactical construct. Why? Because for this population there is more than just a game on the line, there’s lives at stake.

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Nurturing the Athlete - It Takes Time

My father was a gardener and I remember the first time he took me to work with him, I was probably ten or eleven years old. As any youngster, I was impatient and full of questions. I wanted to know why this patch of garden had no plants. Why we had to water this area and fertilize another section. Why we had to trim these plants and let others grow. I wanted to know why he didn’t plant all the seeds at the same time. He explained it to me, but I must admit that I did not fully understand it until years later after I had started coaching. The carrots had to be planted at a certain time. The winter and summer squash were different. Some vegetables thrived in the cold of winter and others need the heat of summer. The same is true with the nurturing of the athlete. You must carefully cultivate the soil by developing physical competencies. Then you plant appropriate levels of training of the various physical capacities. You allow those capacities to grow and develop and then you carefully harvest them in competition. At no time is anything forced. Developing athleticism is a long-term process that requires constant attention from the gardener/coach.

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Real Change

Change will come not by finding new answers to old questions, but real change will come from abandoning the old questions, stop trying to answer them, leave them. Ask new questions and reframe the old ones. Asking the same old questions just leads to rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic, not a real practical solution for the problem at hand.

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A Few Definitions

Here's a few definitions that have a lot of meaning in training:

Organism: a form of life made up of mutually interdependent parts that maintain vital processes.

Machine: an apparatus consisting of interrelated parts with separate functions used in the performance of work.

Interesting how these two words are similar, but vastly different.  Yet, in the training world the connotation is often to train the body like a machine.  In all reality, why would we?  That's something to think about.  Are an athlete's parts replaceable?  How about the athlete's psyche, is it on automatic like a switch?  What about the systemic effect of work on the human body compared to that of a machine?

We need to start thinking differently about the meaning of these terms in regards to training human athletes.

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My name is Cameron Forbes and I am currently in my last semester of graduate school at Meredith College seeking a Master degree in Nutrition. My passion for nutrition started in high school when I was looking for an edge on the competition in athletics. I took this passion with me to NC State University where I graduated with a B.S in Applied Nutrition. While at NC State I worked as a student athletic trainer and a sports nutrition intern my entire undergraduate career. I have been a strength and conditioning coach for over a year, but have been training since high school.  Being in an athletic setting my entire life, I have seen the impact proper nutrition can have on an individual’s training. Within the next year I hope to obtain two major certifications/licensers. The first will be a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist and the second will be a Registered Dietitian/Registered Dietitian Nutritionist.
 
MAIN TALKING POINTS
 
1.Weight loss = Calories in < Calories out
2.The best diet is one you can follow consistently
3.Use an online RMR calculator to find your estimated caloric total for a maintenance weight, then subtract 250-1000 calories for 0.5lb-2.0lbs of weight loss per week
4.These are ESTIMATIONS. You may need to tweak these numbers to find your true maintenance calorie goal.
5.To promote maximum lean muscle gain, .7-1.0g of protein per pound of body weight is recommended.
 
 
Let me start by saying that nutrition goals can be as simple as expending more calories than you take in. If your goal is to simply lose weight there is no need to overcomplicate things.
 

Calories in (eating) < Calories out (exercise/daily activities) = Weight loss
 
On the opposite end of the spectrum, nutrition goals can be as specific as hitting daily target macronutrients (Carbohydrates/Protein/Fat). An example of this would be eating 300g carbohydrate/200g protein/80g fat. This goal equates to a daily caloric intake of roughly 2,720 calories. If you are wondering how I got this caloric estimate; carbohydrates and protein account for 4 calories per gram, while fat accounts for 9 calories per gram. This dietary method requires tracking of your daily food intake and accurately estimating portion sizes. Most people aren’t extremely accurate when it comes to eyeballing portion sizes, so a weight scale is usually recommended to measure foods in grams or ounces.
 
Why would someone be crazy enough to weigh every gram or ounce of food they eat? If they’re a competitive athlete they may be looking for an edge on the competition. By portioning out the proper macronutrient amounts before, during, and after training or competition days, an athlete can maximize their potential each and every session. You could just be completely crazy like myself and track everything you eat because you enjoy seeing trends in your caloric/macronutrient consumption and your body weight/composition. This method works for me because I enjoy it and I see the best results. In other words, this diet is SUSTAINABLE and something I can adhere to on a consistent basis.
 
I firmly believe the best diet is one you can follow consistently
 
There are no magical diets. If you enjoy the Paleo diet and can follow that for long periods of time, DO IT. If you like a ketogenic diet because your love for fats and protein outweigh your love for carbohydrate, DO IT. The common theme here is your dietary goals should be realistic and attainable. Consistency is the key when it comes to weight loss. You should be aiming for NO MORE than 1-2lbs of weight loss per week. Obviously this will fluctuate from person to person, but these are all general guidelines. This slow weight loss will allow you to keep your calories relatively high (in regards to your own body weight/metabolism) and will avoid the feeling of being on a “diet.” Slow weight loss will promote sustained weight loss, meaning the weight will come off and stay off.
 
How Do I Know How Many Calories I Should be Eating?
 
            The first thing to do is estimate how many calories you burn in a given day based on your age, height, weight and activity factor. By using the Mifflin St. Jeor equation you can get an estimate of your resting metabolic rate or RMR (the minimum amount of calories you burn by just being alive). For the sake of avoiding confusing, here is a link to calculate your RMR (http://www.calculateyourrmr.com). To get an accurate estimate of calories you burn during a given day, your daily activities must be taken into account. This is known as your activity factor. Below is a description of different activity factors, which you can choose to accurately describe your day to day activity. Remember, these numbers are estimations and not 100% accurate. However, they do give you a great starting point from which you can make adjustments later.
 
Mifflin St. Jeor Equation: 
Men
10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (y) + 5
 
Women
10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (y) – 161
 
Activity Factors:
1.2 = Sedentary. Little to no regular exercise
 
1.375 = Mild activity level: Intensive exercise for at least 20 minutes 1 to 3 times per week. This may include such things as bicycling, jogging, basketball, swimming, skating, etc.  If you do not exercise regularly, but you maintain a busy life style that requires you to walk frequently for long periods, you meet the requirements of this level. 
 
1.6 = Moderate activity level: Intensive exercise for at least 30 to 60 minutes 3 to 4 times per week. Any of the activities listed above will qualify.   
 
1.7 = Heavy or (Labor-intensive) activity level: Intensive exercise for 60 minutes or greater 5 to 7 days per week (see sample activities above).  Labor-intensive occupations also qualify for this level.  Labor-intensive occupations include construction work (brick laying, carpentry, general labor, etc.). Also farming, landscape worker or similar occupations.    
 
1.9 = Extreme level: Exceedingly active and/or very demanding activities:  Examples include:  (1) athlete with an almost unstoppable training schedule with multiple training sessions throughout the day  (2) very demanding job, such as shoveling coal or working long hours on an assembly line. Generally, this level of activity is very difficult to achieve. 
 
            Once you have calculated your estimated daily caloric requirement, this number will represent the number of calories you need a day to maintain your current weight. You will need to subtract 250 calories from this and that will give you an expected 0.5lb per week loss. I will show a table below that can help explain this in further detail in respect to both weight gain and weight loss.
           
DAILY CALORIC REQUIREMENTS
3000 calories/day
DAILY CALORIES                                  EXPECTED WEIGHT LOSS/GAIN
4000                                                   +2.0lbs per week
3750                                                    +1.5lbs per week
3500                                                   +1.0lbs per week
3250                                                    +0.5lbs per week
2750                                                    -0.5lbs per week
2500                                                   -1.0lbs per week
2250                                                   -1.5lbs per week
2000                                                  -2.0lbs per week

 Maximizes Muscle Gain
 
            If your goal is to gain lean muscle mass there are a two things you must do. The first may seem simple, but many people do not do this with the consistency they need to see results. It is LIFT WEIGHTS. Go in the gym, pick up heavy stuff, put it down. Obviously having a plan of attack is recommended, but you must induce a stress on your muscles to stimulate muscle growth. The second factor in increasing lean muscle mass is protein intake. Many individuals fall short of the daily protein intake needed to maximize muscle hypertrophy.
The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein set by the U.S Government is .8g/kg of body weight. This means a 220lb person would need 80g of protein according to the RDAs. However, research has shown that to maximize muscle hypertrophy you should be ingesting 1.2-2.0g/kg of body weight. This means that same 220lb person would need to have a protein intake of 120g-200g to maximize their potential lean muscle gain. Other researchers have even suggested ingesting up to 2.2g/kg of body weight (equivalent to 1g/pound). These are also general guidelines. If you want specific dietary advice geared directly toward your goals and needs, seek out a professional.
 
 
 
I want to thank The Strength Feed for giving me the opportunity and platform to express my opinion to his followers. If you want to achieve your fitness goals and have fun doing it, hit this man up! If you enjoyed this content, found anything I covered useful, or would like for me to cover specific nutrition topics, please reach out to The Strength Feed and let him know.
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Authentic Leadership

To be a leader you must have followers. Carefully watch who real follows whom. Carefully watch the dynamics of a squad. The athlete who screams the most often and the loudest is often identified as the leader. Why? Because he or she is voluble and calling attention to themselves? If you observe closely the real leader is the one who says little, but when they speak everyone listens. They are there in victory and defeat with a pat on the back and an appropriate word or phrase. This is the authentic leader because they are focused on the team not on standing out and calling attention to themselves. Their presence and example inspire their teammates to follow.

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Ancillary Work?

To label work such at hurdle mobility drills, mini band series etc. as “ancillary work” is a misrepresentation of what that work is and what needs to be done. It is not ancillary, it is essential work, a component of any sound training program. It is basic and remedial designed to address each athlete individual needs. It is most effective when woven or threaded through the fabric of the actual training sessions. This type of work can be excellent to lead into or lead out of a particular segment of training or to transition between segments, It is integral work.

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S&C = Athletic Daycare

The sport coach sends the athletes to do S&C in the weight room without any idea of what they will do. There is little or no accountability of the S&C for the athlete’s performance or the lack thereof. I compare it to taking you preschooler to daycare, they get tired, you get a break for a short time, and they take better naps. You need to expect and demand more than daycare if you are a sport coach.

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Cross Training

Frankly I have never been a fan of the term cross training or the concept. I have seen it used too often as just another way to get tired. By definition Cross Training “… is when an athlete undertakes training in a discipline other than their main sport for the sole purpose of enhancing performance in their primary event.” (Hawley & Burke P. 31) It has been primarily used as a method for retaining training adaptations. What we are really talking about here is transfer of training effect.

It has been my experience that those who utilize cross training the most are those who already have a tendency to chronically overwork and are looking for another way to punish themselves. I feel that this is another training myth that detracts from sound training. It certainly has very little foundation is sports science research. For a runner to get in the pool for anything more than a recovery session is time ill spent. The same is true for biking, that time would be better spent strength training or working on flexibility, both areas that tend to be ignored. Most of the time they are ignored because the runner feels they do not have enough time to fit it in. Yet those same runners can find the time to swim for thirty minutes or bike for an hour. It is all a matter of priorities. Cross training may be OK for the recreational athlete seeking to relive the boredom of training, but for the high-level athlete it is virtually useless. “Specific exercise elicits specific adaptations, creating specific training effects.” (McArdle, Katch & Katch P.394). Less we forget, you are what you train to

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Why, Why Not?

Why does the Newtonian, mechanistic reductionist approach that focuses on minutiae and the parts persist? Why not a quantum approach that focuses on relationships and connections, flow and rhythm. The former is comfortable because it allows people cleaner definitions and seemingly straightforward solutions, in some ways it simplistic because all you have to do in that approach is be a technician. If you understand how all the muscles work, what inhibits, what lengthens, what you need to activate and then what you need to integrate it all fits into a neat clean little box. Just follow the algorithm and push a few buttons and everything is fixed. Unfortunately, or fortunately it is not that easy. The body is a self-organizing chaotic system that is highly adaptable. It responds both negatively and positively to use and disuse. It is definitely not a machine. As coaches, trainers, therapists and doctors we must recognize the wisdom of the body and train or treat accordingly. The best way to understand and assess movement is to get the body moving. Closely observe and feel how things connect and how they disconnect. Explore the dimensions that the wisdom of the body offers. As coaches we must prepare the body for the demands of the sport. We do that by stressing the body up to and beyond its limits at times. If we do that in a systematic and sensible manner the body will adapt and be able to thrive in the competitive environment.

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We do that!

Great if you do that then why do you have hamstring injuries and ACL tears. Why do your teams run out of gas in the fourth quarter or last part of the season? It’s not the exercise. It’s how you are coaching the exercises that make the exercises meaningful for the athlete. Just doing it is not good enough. It must be done better with intention, direction and purpose.

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Is your work working?

Is your work working? How do you know? Look closely at what you are doing? Look even more closely at what you are not doing? Eliminate the fluff, the stuff that makes you tired but does not make you better. Set your priorities based on the need to do, the areas that will provide results. Follow the words of Francis of Assisi “Start by doing what is necessary; then do what is possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”

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The Sports Performance Manager’s role is for the development and supervision of the day to day operations of the Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush Sports Performance Center in Oak Brook Illinois. This person will report to the Facility Manager (FM) to create a symbiotic relationship between the two sectors. This person will also work with the Clinical Research Director to assist in research implementation in the sports performance center

 

Qualifications:

  • Preferable Post graduate degree in kinesiology, exercise science or athletic training
  • Strength and conditioning certification, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and National Academy of Sports Medicine, Performance Enhancement Specialist
  • Minimum of 3 years of professional strength and conditioning experience in clinic, high school, collegiate and/or professional team environment
  • Experienced in developing and marketing self pay clinical bridge and youth and adult fitness programs
  • Experienced in developing and marketing self pay clinical bridge and youth and adult fitness programs

Job responsibilities

  • Assist in planning and developing and implementing the Center’s operations, equipment required and all systematic processes
  • Develop and Market all programs including working with outreach programs, affiliations and community based programs. Examples include
    • Individual bridge programs
      • ACL return to sport post rehab
      • Overhead Throwing post rehab
      • Hip return to sports rehab
      • Running analysis with program
    • Youth group programs to focus on development of balance, coordination, strength, running technique, footwork, endurance and flexibility
      • Jump start program (12 and under)
      • Total Performance ( age 13 and above)
    • Adult fitness programs. Private or semi-private session that customize and individualize approach to optimize health and fitness, well being, injury prevention or whatever the client’s goals are
  • Manage daily operations of respective facility
  • Maintain physical environment of facility and equipment
  • Make recommendations for purchase of new equipment and/or capital expenses
  • Work with the Facility Manager (FM) on quarterly and yearly financial review and budget
  • Perform monthly, quarterly and yearly analysis of metrics ( volume, parity, referral sources, charges)
  • Coordinate and lead referral efforts with the MOR physicians and staff
  • Work with the FM to incorporate any necessary information for the quarterly staff meetings
  • Meet regularly with the FM for the continuation of developing, marketing and implementing programs for the Sports Performance clinic
  • Working with the Clinical Research Director to assist/facilitate any data collection within the sports performance center

Staffing responsibilities:

  • Determine volume/capacity with FM to justify additional staffing
  • Conduct interviews and hire qualified individuals for Sports Performance staffing
  • Coordinate orientation of new employees with corporate office
  • Oversee professional development and education of staff
  • Determine and hold the staff responsible for required metrics and expectations with FM
  • Conduct annual performance/bonus appraisals and 90 day reviews for professional staff, aides and office staff with FM.
  • Oversee daily schedule and staffing
  • Meet quarterly with each employee to review metrics and performance
  • Salary:
    • Base Salary with bonus incentive based upon the net revenue of the Sports Performance Center.
  • Schedule/Hours of the center
    • Monday through Friday, 6:00am-7:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm initially but with the ability to grow to Monday through Friday, 5:00am-8:00pm.

Please contact Donna Williams with resume and cover letter: donna.williams@rushortho.com

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Do not look for adversity, look for opportunity. Ask yourself what I can do each day to make the athletes that I work with better. Carefully study the movements of the sports – understand the forces and how they are produced and reduced and train accordingly. Get away from artificial limiting beliefs about what the body cannot do – focus on the infinite possibilities that the body presents to solve movement problems. Train movements to enhance coordination and efficiency of movement. The body is completely adaptable. It has an amazing ability to compensate and solve movement problems. Yes, I said compensate, great athletes are great compensators and it is OK!

Artificial sterile environments or strict “correct” movements do not expand the body’s ability to adapt to the demands of the sport. Sterile and artificial training environments and scenarios result in adapted bodies that cannot change and adjust to the random and chaotic demands of the sport. Open challenging movement enriched environments create adaptable athletes who are able to adjust and modify movements on demand. These adaptable athletes, given a level of talent, are high performers and stay injury free.

Which would you prefer if you were to choose an athlete for competition? Do you want a dinosaur type who is completely adapted and on their way to extinction or a cockroach type athlete who is thriving and highly adaptable? I know who I want – I want the cockroach who can adapt to any environment or under any circumstances. Ask yourself – Are you training your athletes to be dinosaurs or cockroaches? I want adaptable athletes who can solve any movement problem presented to them?

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I will hold to my belief that the concept of the 24-Hour Athlete is a valid concept that we should not comprise on. Conceptually and in reality, we need to get our athletes to lead lives that are conducive to athletic excellence. You can’t be excellent two hours during training, or just twelve hours during the day and do things that are counterproductive to excellence the rest of the time. We must raise the bar, not lower it. I agree that the young athlete of today has more going on in their life – so what. They need to be taught to focus and commit. They expect the same rewards, don’t they? We as coaches must set the example and get athletes to commit to an approach to excellence that involves all hours of the day. I know I am getting old and these ideas seem old fashioned, but I know they work; I have lived it as an athlete and a coach. When I first started coaching I was training for the decathlon, coaching track at two schools, also coached basketball that year, taught a full teaching load, was married and had a bit of life. We must teach the young coaches and athletes that it takes total commitment; excellence is not a passing fancy. You must strive to win each workout before you can ever bear the fruits of victory. If we give into this generation then it will only get worse going forward. Is it work, you bet it is. Does it take energy, it sure does, but we must do it.

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Some Thoughts to Stimulate Thought

Respect is earned not bought

Knowledge and wisdom eventually win out over hype and promotion

Coaching is special because of the impact you can have lives and the daily lesson you learn

I coached 23 years before I produced my first video – it took me that long to learn something that I could share

I am an idealist. I dream of the way things should be and try to make it happen.

Knowledge without passion is wasted; people do their best when they are passionlessly engaged

There is no set formula for training; there are principles that are highly adaptive and adaptable

Understanding context is essential

There are few new ideas, they are just old ideas repackaged

Specialize in being a generalist

Research and science are wonderful, but they must be tempered with practice and common sense

Coaching is talking, listening, seeing, and doing. It is totally multidimensional. It is not about me, it is about we and us.

Friendship is special, cherish your friends

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